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Attorney Advertising: Website content for informational and educational purposes only and should not be substituted for speaking with an attorney.  All cases are different, and past results do not guarantee future outcomes. All fees must be finalized in writing and may vary based on the circumstances of a case.

Fraud, Embezzlement, and "White Collar" Charges


In a state or federal investigation, the people responsible for a business may commit fraud, embezzlement, and other deceptive practices, but the mangers or other employees arranging for the financial transactions might get caught in the middle of an investigation or blamed for a crime.  A white-collar case can be easier to defend because of the trail of paperwork and computer files, but the investigation may take a substantial amount of time and commitment.

In these cases, the government may confiscate a defendant’s money or assets and keep the "ill-gotten gains" after a conviction. An effective lawyer will work closely with the prosecution and the client to broker a reasonable deal. Often, the government will settle for only a portion of the assets, allowing the client to keep the majority of the money, jewelry, or other valuable property.

The best defense lawyers will use the accounting paper trail and the past business practices to prove that a client did not commit a fraud or embezzle money or assets.  In these cases, the prosecution must prove a knowing or intentionally deceptive act.  If a person had no knowledge of deceptive practices, the prosecution cannot prove a felony fraud, larceny, or embezzlement.  

A white collar prosecution can last for a notoriously long amount of time, especially in federal cases (a recent case with one fraud count lasted seven years before the final sentence).  A defendant should be careful to not sign an hourly retainer agreement. Otherwise, a relatively straightforward defense could drain an entire life’s savings. It is not uncommon for a person, whose company was targeted by the prosecution, to pay a law firm $50,000 in total hourly-fees to investigate the paper trail, to draw the line between the client and the responsible party, and to gain immunity for the client.

The Law Office of Adam Bevelacqua offers flat fees to avoid surprises or the high legal costs of long prosecutions. Contact the Law Office of Adam Bevelacqua at (917) 656 - 7076 or bevelacqualaw@gmail.com and speak to a criminal defense lawyer immediately.